April 1989

  • 2 April – As for Károly Grósz, the labelling of the events of 1956 as a popular uprising is too simplistic, the precise approach is to refer to it as a student demonstration, a process in which an uprising shifts to a counter-revolution. The political rehabilitation of Imre Nagy seems impossible, he thinks, experts shall be appointed to implement the legal rehabilitation.
  • 3 April – Negotiations between Kiszczak and Wałęsa launch again in Magdalenka. By the finish of the talks, the negotiators reach a compromise about the legislative and judicial power of the future president, and the mandate distribution of the Sejm and the Senate. In line with that, in the Sejm, the Polish United Workers’ Party and its coalition partners, as well as, different Catholic organisations will receive 65% out of the 299 mandates. The rest 35% (161 mandates) are to distribute in accordance with the results of the elections.
  • 5 April – In Poland, the Round Table Talks come to an end. Parties announce a mutual agreement, in which they declare that ”in the spirit of the social agreements made in 1980, a Dialogue established that connects the Polish with one another via the issues of the economy, culture, society and the state, as well as, the faith of the Polish families, the future of the country, and the general responsibility for the future of Poland.” According to the Agreement, the democratization of the political system is indispensible, just like the authorisation for political pluralism and the freedom of speech, the holding of free elections, the guaranteeing of the independent judiciary, the implementation of the freely-chosen territorial self-management. They also stress ”the necessary state reforms are to implement in line with the national interest, also, in accordance with the state interest via evolutionary ways.” The parties agree on the undertaking of the next, early parliamentary elections (the parliament involves the Sejm and the Senate), and accept the principle of mandate distribution. They determine the tasks and responsibilities of the next Parliament, and the powers of the Sejm, the Senate and the President of Republic.
  • 7 April – In Poland, the Session of the Sejm adopts the previously adopted Constitutional Amendments and the changes to legislation as the outcomes of the former Round Table Talks.
  • 12 April – At the Session of the Central Committee of the Hungarian Socialist Workers’ Party, a new 9-member Political Committee is appointed. Károly Grósz is to become the Secretary-General again. János Kádár also attends the session and reports on his medical condition. That is Kádár’s last, memorable speech about the sentence and the execution of Imre Nagy. He speaks slowly, haltingly and in a manner that is hard to understand.
  • 15 April – The reform powers of the Hungarian Socialist Workers’ Party are consulting in Kecskemét. They demand an Extraordinary Congress to hold.
  • 17 April – The former First Secretary of the Communist Party of Czechoslovakia Alexander Dubček gives an interview for Panoráma, the Hungarian Television production dealing with foreign affairs. The former Czechoslovakian leader criticises the current Czechoslovakian leadership. In relevance with Hungary, Dubček speaks about János Kádár with harsh criticism, stating that Kádár failed him in 1968. The interview attracts a very high level of response in Czechoslovakia.
  • 17 April – The Court of Warsaw reregisters the Independent Self-governing Trade Union “Solidarity”.
  • 18 April – Lech Wałęsa and Minister of Interior Czesław Kiszczak negotiate about setting a committee that shall verify the enforcement of the Round Table Agreements.
  • 19–22 April – Lech Wałęsa pays a visit in Rome. Pope John Paul II receives him.
  • 21–23 April – The 12th (final) Congress of the Young Communist League (KISZ) and the first National Assembly of the Hungarian Federation of Democratic Youth (DEMISZ) takes place in Budapest.
  • 22 April – The first official meeting held with the participation of the Leadership and the representatives of the opposition.
  • 25 April – The withdrawal of the Soviet military troops stationing in Hungary launches. (The last Soviet soldier leaves the country 19th June 1991.)
  • 25 April – The Secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Czechoslovakia Jan Fojtík says Czechoslovakia is not to return to ”the outdated bourgeois parliamentary system ”, while the transformation is to achieve ”in line with the norms of Leninism”.
  • 26 April – Miloš Jakeš says the reforms are to give an impetus from 1st January 1990.